Interactive exhibition which brings visitors into the world of people with autism to visit Tallaght

AsIAm.ie will host a unique exhibition which will enable visitors to experience what it is like for people with autism to deal with the world around them.

The exhibition, which is free to visit, will be in Tallaght Stadium on the 19th January, 4:30pm – 8pm, and the 20th January, 1pm – 4:30pm.

The pop-up exhibition uses an engaging “questions and answers” format as well as a series of activities to answer young people’s questions and enable visitors to step into the shoes of those with the condition.

This includes using sound, smells, touch and sight experiments to bring neurotypical (those without Autism) people into the world of those with the condition.

“People with autism often experience a sense of being overwhelmed and confused by what others see as normal life, and this exhibition will allow those attending to understand this more than they have done before,” according to the CEO of AsIAm Adam Harris.

The exhibition, which was launched in June 2016, aims to engage young people in particular and has visited Wicklow, Ennis, Dublin and the Midlands to date.

Visitors are given an MP3 player which gives them an audio guide through 15 stages which allow them experience different aspects of life with autism.

“Neurotypical people engage with people with autism all the time but often do not know how to relate well to them because they do not understand how the world looks for someone on the spectrum”, according to Adam Harris.

“Through visiting this exhibition we believe young people will be much better equipped to engage with people with autism who they meet regularly in their day-to-day lives.”

The exhibition was developed by the AsIAm Youth Leadership Team, a group of young people with Autism who act as advocates for the organisation.

It is part of a larger campaign to engage young people in Autism issues which includes a social media campaign and a website, youthhub.asiam.ie

Around 1 in 65 people in Ireland live with Autism and are to be found in every community and school in the country.

They apply for every type of job but are often misunderstood, excluded or left behind due to a lack of understanding in society.

Because understanding of autism remains limited in society, people with Autism face many barriers including bullying, unemployment and mental health difficulties.

AsIAm.ie is working to change attitudes on Autism in Ireland and believes young people can help to change this.

Now is the time for this to happen, as we see a generation of young people, diagnosed as children, reaching adulthood and seeking employment, relationships, friendship and access to university.

For more information please go to AsIAm.ie or click on the following link